Wheelchair Van Information

VMi New England Mobility Center

Wheelchair Vans

 

Wheelchair Accessible Vans


If you think the field of wheelchair accessible vans is limited to full-sized conversion vehicles, think again. The term encapsulates any vehicle that can be modified to provide easy access for those who use wheelchairs.


That access is usually accomplished by adjusting the “stock” version of the vehicle. That includes modifications designed to facilitate easier wheelchair entry and exit including door height and vehicle height changes. It usually involves the addition of a wheelchair ramp or lift, as well. Other potential conversions include changes to steering and braking systems, suspension alterations, automatic entry systems and countless other interior and exterior customizations.

Honda


About Honda
Honda first made a name for itself with scooters, small motorcycles and dirt bikes. As gas prices lurched higher and higher, the manufacturer developed a solid reputation as a source of reliable, fuel efficient passenger cars.

Today, Honda supplements its passenger car line with minivans, SUVs and other vehicles. Some of these have become very popular as wheelchair accessible vans. Honda’s wheelchair vans are unlikely to ever outnumber Honda Civics, but they’re increasing in popularity all of the time.

Why does Honda make wheelchair vans?
Truth be told, Honda isn’t in the business of making wheelchair vans. It is in the business of making great vehicles that readily lend themselves to wheelchair van conversion. Models like the Odyssey and the Element would sell well regardless of their use in wheelchair van circles. Honda undoubtedly appreciates their popularity in the accessibility market and takes that under consideration when making the vehicles, though.

As we continue to see an increased demand for accessible vehicles and the reputation of Honda wheelchair vans continues to grow, we can undoubtedly expect to see more Odyssey and Element conversions on the road.

Honda’s Wheelchair Vans

The Odyssey minivan and the Element crossover SUV are both extremely popular conversion targets and are happily used by thousands of people who rely upon wheelchairs.


These Honda wheelchair vans don’t roll off the assembly line ready for use. They start out as standard passenger vehicles and are then modified by conversion experts for wheelchair use. That happens because people hold the Odyssey and Element in high regard.

Honda isn’t known for full-sized vans, but two of its smaller vehicles have strong fan bases in the wheelchair van community.

Honda’s get strong marks from their purchasers on a number of fronts. Here are three of them:

  1. First, they’re aesthetically pleasing. The Element is one of the more attractive vehicles that are well suited for conversion and the Odyssey impresses critics year after year with its good-looking design.

  2. Second, Honda has earned their reputation for reliability and cost-effectiveness. These are sturdy, reliable options that consistently provide a great deal of bang for the buyer’s buck, matching the manufacturer’s overall profile.

  3. Third, conversion pros have turned the process of making a stock Honda into an impressive Honda wheelchair van into a science. The adjustments necessary to make the transition are proven and effective. Put simply, these vehicles make great wheelchair vans.

Dodge


About Dodge

Dodge has re-branded itself over the course of the last few years. They’ve gone from building a reputation as a “something for everyone” automaker to a producer of high-performance, high-capacity trucks and passenger cars with a “muscular” edge.

Even with that change in focus, Dodge continues to produce its Caravan and Grand Caravan minivan. It also produces a compelling full-sized van, the Dodge Sprinter. These vehicles are often converted to serve as wheelchair accessible vans.



Why does Dodge Make Wheelchair accessible Vans?

The truth is Dodge doesn’t make wheelchair accessible vans - The term “wheelchair accessible vans” refers to any vehicle that can be customized for use by a person utilizing a wheelchair. - They make multiple vehicles that are easily converted into Dodge wheelchair vans by professionals who specialize in these modifications such as VMI or Braun.


Dodge continues to produce these popular wheelchair van options because they’ve been well received in the marketplace. Research suggests continued increases in demand for accessible vehicles, which means we’ll probably be seeing Dodge wheelchair vans for years to come.

 


Van to Wheelchair Van

In order to make a wheelchair van accessible, after market conversions are usually required. Conversion professionals adjust vehicle height by raising roofs and lowering floors. Adjustments to door height may also be necessary. Turning a “stock” vehicle into a wheelchair accessible van will usually involve installation of a ramp or lift and may include a number of other customizations, as well.



Dodge Wheelchair Vans

Dodge produces two different models that have tremendous popularity in the world of wheelchair van conversion: The Caravan/Grand Caravan minivan and the Sprinter full-sized van. That makes Dodge one of the few manufacturers that offer both minivan and full-sized options that have achieved high levels of popularity within the wheelchair conversion world.

Chrysler

Chrysler Town & Country is one of the nation's best-selling and most luxurious minivans. Chrysler Town & Country was the first minivan in the world, and Chrysler has continued to lead the way in minivan styling and technology. This technologically advanced and extremely safe vehicle is our flagship conversion. We are proud to offer this van which will surely become a welcome addition into anyone’s life.

Toyota


The Toyota Sienna is known for its reliability and comfort, and it’s one of the most popular minivans on the market today. Because of this, VMI has taken the Sienna and added its VMI Northstar conversion to create one of the most exciting new lowered floor minivans around. This Toyota wheelchair van comes with lots of extra touches for your convenience and comfort, and it drives smoothly.


Toyota Sienna wheelchair van owners may modify the vehicles to serve as either side entry or rear entry wheelchair vans.  You will see both options around, but side entry models significantly outnumber rear entry models. 


The Toyota Sienna has become one of the most popular wheelchair van options since its redesign in 2004.  That's when Toyota decided to improve and update the vehicle.  Since that time, they've made only incremental improvements to what turned out to be an excellent design.


The Sienna is popular among wheelchair van drivers for a number of reasons. 

  1. The Van offers the kind of spacious interior that lends itself to wheelchair van conversion. 

  2. The Sienna is well known for its overall longevity and reliability. 

  3. A number of top conversion manufacturers have been working with the Sienna since 2005 and are capable of transforming it into a fully functional and highly accessible vehicle.

More Honda Odyssey Interior Wheelchair Van Features


Honda Odyssey Steering Devices
Are you worried about being able to successfully steer your Honda Odyssey wheelchair van? If so, you might want to consider any of the many steering devices available as adaptations. Hand controls are one popular choice. Low-effort and zero-effort steering are also available for those who can use the standard steering wheel with assistance.


Honda Odyssey Power Seat Bases
You can use a power seat base to make the transition from wheelchair to driver’s seat easier once you’re within your Honda Odyssey. These powered options allow for easy maneuvering with very little effort. They’re a popular adaptation and are not difficult to install.

 

Honda Odyssey Automatic Door Openers
Are you concerned that you will have difficulties struggling with the doors on your Honda Odyssey wheelchair van? If so, you’ll be relieved to know that there’s an easy fix for those hard-to open doors. Automatic door openers provide access with the click of a button. A second click on your keychain remote will close the doors. 

 

Honda Odyssey Hand Controls
Are you unable to use the standard pedals in a Honda Odyssey wheelchair van? If so, you do have a viable alternative. Hand controls can replace the “stock” pedals. You’ll be able to safely accelerate and brake using hand controls. They’re easy to use with a little training and practice and are a popular conversion.

 

Honda Odyssey Transfer Seats
Getting in and out of a Honda Odyssey wheelchair van isn’t that difficult. A good conversion will make it just as easy to move from your wheelchair to the driver’s seat once you’re within the vehicle. Transfer seats are designed to facilitate that maneuver with minimal efforts. Using them is much easier than trying to make the move from chair to driver’s seat without modification.

 

Honda Odyssey Raised Roofs
Raised roofs are used in wheelchair van conversions to increase headroom and entryway clearance. Honda Odyssey wheelchair van users rarely make use of this option. The preferred means of maximizing access is lowering the vehicle’s floor. Currently, the most popular conversions, including those performed by VMI don’t involve a raised roof.

 

Honda Odyssey Raised Rear Door
Most Honda Odyssey wheelchair van users convert their vehicle for side-entry. However, VMI and other conversion companies have created rear-entry wheelchair vans, as well. Those who opt for rear entry may need to raise the rear door to make easy entry and exit possible.

 

Honda Odyssey Raised Side Door
Some wheelchair vans require the use of a raised side door to provide adequate clearance and headroom within the vehicle and to facilitate easier entrance and exit. Honda Odyssey owners are usually able to secure adequate space without this modification. Instead, they drop the vehicle’s floor.

 

Honda Odyssey Remote Entry
Opening and closing the doors of a wheelchair van can be a serious challenge for some disabled drivers. Remote entry resolves the problem. A few clicks on a keychain remote can unlock and open the sliding doors of the Honda Odyssey, allowing the wheelchair user to get in and out of the vehicle without struggling with inconveniently placed handles and heavy doors.


Honda Odyssey Half Drop Lowered Floor
The Honda Odyssey provides a great deal of space, but it isn’t quite adequate “right off the assembly line.” In order to facilitate entry and exit--and to provide sufficient headroom once inside the vehicle--a conversion manufacturer can lower the floor. The Odyssey can handle half drop and full drop lowered floors. The decision of which option to make will usually be based on whether the vehicle is set for side entry or rear entry and the owner’s budget.

 

Honda Odyssey Removable Seating
In order to convert a stock Honda Odyssey into a functional wheelchair van, the owner will need to reconfigure the base seating plan. Side entry wheelchair van users will want to change the center row of seating. Those who use the less common rear entry plan will need to eliminate the third row. Luckily, removable seating is part of the Odyssey’s design. It’s easy to jettison unwanted seats.

 

Honda Odyssey Rear Bench Seat
The Honda Odyssey comes with a rear bench seat, although it is possible to explore alternatives for that area. Those who decide to convert the Odyssey for use as a rear-entry wheelchair van will find it necessary to remove the bench seat to create adequate space. Those who use a side entry arrangement will usually leave the bench seat in place to serve as a passenger option.

 

Honda Odyssey Removable Passenger Seat
If a wheelchair user plans to sit in the passenger are, he or she may want to remove the stock passenger seat. That’s also true if the driver of a Honda Odyssey knows that he or she will regular transport another wheelchair user. Removing the passenger seat is a relatively simple proposition and any reputable conversion company should be able to do the job.


Honda Odyssey Removable Driver’s Seat
Some wheelchair-bound drivers will use transfer seats to get from their chairs into the driver’s seat. Others will prefer to drive from their wheelchair. That’s made possible by removing the stock driver’s seat. It’s a simple modification that any conversion manufacturer should be able to perform quickly and easily.


Honda Odyssey Center Passenger Seat
Honda Odyssey wheelchair van users can set up their vehicles for side or rear entry. Most opt for side entry and that requires adjusting the center passenger seat configuration. Those second row seats can interfere with wheelchair access and can block wheelchair-bound drivers from moving from their chairs to the driver’s seat.


Honda Odyssey Electric Tie Downs
Once a wheelchair is within a Honda Odyssey wheelchair van, it’s important to properly secure it. One way to do that is by using electric tie downs. These motorized options are easier to use and require less physical strength than do traditional, manual tie downs. They’re a nice compromise between the manual tie downs and the more expensive docking systems.


Honda Odyssey Manual Tie Down
Honda Odyssey wheelchair van drivers often use manual tie downs as a means of keeping their chair in place inside the vehicle. They’re not complicated and they’ve been used as a means of keeping wheelchairs safely in place for decades. They’re also the cheapest way to handle the situation.

 

Honda Odyssey Four-Point Tie Downs with Seat Belts
Four point tie downs with seat belts serve two important functions within many Honda Odyssey wheelchair vans. First, the serve to secure and immobilizes the wheelchair once it’s inside the vehicle. Second, they provide additional restraint for the wheelchair user. Safety conscious Odyssey wheelchair van users may be interested in making them a part of their conversion processes.

 

The Honda Odyssey and the EZ Lock
The EZ Lock system is the most effective and simple way to anchor your wheelchair inside your Honda Odyssey. Instead of tying the wheelchair down, a bracket placed on its underside is directed into a high-strength docking mechanism that will lock the chair into place until it is intentionally released. These systems are more expensive than tie downs, but their convenience and power are unrivaled.

 

Honda Odyssey Swivel Seats
A swivel seat can make it easier to get in and out of the front door of your Honda Odyssey. Its pivoting action allows drivers to face the door while avoiding difficult twisting and other movement. They can also be used within the Odyssey to more easily facilitate the transfer from wheelchair to driver’s seat.

More Dodge/Chrysler Wheelchair Van Features


Wheelchair Ramp

Most Grand Caravan wheelchair vans use ramps to facilitate entry and exit to and from the vehicle. Ramps are used on all side-entry wheelchair vans and on many rear-entry modifications. In most cases, users opt for a powered ramp that can be deployed and retracted with a single push of a button. These ramps stow under the vehicle, out of sight, when not in use.



Automatic Folding Ramp

Most Dodge Grand Caravan wheelchair vans use an auto ramp. Some rear-entry variations use a lift and some people opt for manual ramps, but the great majority of conversions feature an auto ramp. These foldout wheelchair ramp deploy and retract with the push of a button and stow away under the vehicle when not in use.



Hitch Mounted Vehicle Ramp

Those who opt for a rear-entry conversion of a Grand Caravan wheelchair van can either use a ramp or a lift for entry. Lifts can be cost-prohibitive and there are many ramp options to choose from. A hitch-mounted vehicle ramp is one option. They aren’t used as often as powered ramps that stow under the vehicle, but the fact that they are easily accessible might make them interesting to some Grand Caravan owners.



Wheelchair Lift

Some Dodge Grand Caravans use a wheelchair lift to facilitate entry into the vehicle. These motorized platforms are a powerful and reliable way to increase access. They’re also rather large. That’s why the only Grand Caravans with lifts are rear-entry models and they feature collapsible lifts that can fold up against the back of the minivan when not in use.



Rear Lift

The Dodge Grand Caravan’s rear lift gate provides access to the rear cargo area. It’s also the point of entry for wheelchair vans configured for rear-entry. Most rear-entry Grand Caravans feature a lowered floor and a vehicle kneel system, but they rarely require substantial physical modification of the lift gate itself.



Scooter Lift

Scooters and power chairs are heavier than traditional wheelchairs, so it requires some muscle to lift them and to move them into the minivan. There are lifts available that are more than up to the task and many are used in rear-entry Grand Caravan wheelchair vans. The Grand Caravan can’t support side entry lifts, but those who want a lift and who use a scooter do have options available to them.



Access Entry Space
Space is a key consideration regarding wheelchair van accessibility. The Grand Caravan supplies more than enough cabin floor space and impressive vertical space, as well.



Lowered Floor

The lowered floor gives plenty of room to move in a Dodge Caravan wheelchair van. Customer have two options, they can choose a half-drop or full-drop floor modification. The adjustment will increase overall clearance by as much as ten full inches.



Roof Height

Many wheelchair vans are modified by raising the roof and/or the doors of the vehicle. That’s unnecessary when one is working with a Dodge Grand Caravan. It’s possible to create the necessary space without taking those actions.



Power Door

A power door can make a huge difference in the accessibility of a Grand Caravan wheelchair van. Many wheelchair users struggle with manual doors and discover that their handles are placed in anticipation of use by standing drivers. Providing an automatic way to enter and exit the vehicle can really empower a wheelchair user. As such, power door modifications are a key part of many wheelchair van conversions.



Automatic Door

Automatic doors are a common feature in Grand Caravans. All but the entry-level models come standard with automatic power sliding doors and remote entry. That’s a nice feature to have when converting a vehicle for use as a wheelchair van. Manual doors can be a challenge for some wheelchair users and pushbutton use is a welcome relief.



Dual Sliding Doors

The Dodge Grand Caravan comes standard with dual sliding doors. The doors are manually operated in the base trim package, but higher trim models have fully automatic sliding doors with remote entry. Sliding doors are integral to converting the Grand Caravan for use as a side-entry wheelchair vehicle. The provide enough room to provide easy entrance and exit to and from the vehicle.

 

Power Seat Bases

You can use a power seat base to make the transition from wheelchair to driver’s seat easier once you’re within your Dodge. These powered options allow for easy maneuvering with very little effort. They’re a popular adaptation and are not difficult to install.



Transfer Seats

Getting in and out of a Dodge wheelchair van isn’t that difficult. A good conversion will make it just as easy to move from your wheelchair to the driver’s seat once you’re within the vehicle. Transfer seats are designed to facilitate that maneuver with minimal efforts. Using them is much easier than trying to make the move from chair to driver’s seat without modification.


Removable Seating

In order to convert a stock Dodge into a functional wheelchair van, the owner will need to reconfigure the base seating plan. Side entry wheelchair van users will want to change the center row of seating. Those who use the less common rear entry plan will need to eliminate the third row. Luckily, removable seating is part of the Dodge’s design. It’s easy to jettison unwanted seats.

 


Rear Bench Seat

The Dodge comes with a rear bench seat, although it is possible to explore alternatives for that area. Those who decide to convert the Dodge for use as a rear-entry wheelchair van will find it necessary to remove the bench seat to create adequate space. Those who use a side entry arrangement will usually leave the bench seat in place to serve as a passenger option.

 


Removable Passenger Seat

If a wheelchair user plans to sit in the passenger are, he or she may want to remove the stock passenger seat. That’s also true if the driver of a dodge knows that he or she will regular transport another wheelchair user. Removing the passenger seat is a relatively simple proposition and any reputable conversion company should be able to do the job.



Removable Driver’s Seat

Some wheelchair-bound drivers will use transfer seats to get from their chairs into the driver’s seat. Others will prefer to drive from their wheelchair. That’s made possible by removing the stock driver’s seat. It’s a simple modification that any conversion manufacturer should be able to perform quickly and easily.



Center Passenger Seat

Dodge wheelchair van users can set up their vehicles for side or rear entry. Most opt for side entry and that requires adjusting the center passenger seat configuration. Those second row seats can interfere with wheelchair access and can block wheelchair-bound drivers from moving from their chairs to the driver’s seat.



Electric Tie Downs

Once a wheelchair is within a Dodge wheelchair van, it’s important to properly secure it. One way to do that is by using electric tie downs. These motorized options are easier to use and require less physical strength than do traditional, manual tie downs. They’re a nice compromise between the manual tie downs and the more expensive docking systems.



Manual Tie Down

Dodge wheelchair van drivers often use manual tie downs as a means of keeping their chair in place inside the vehicle. They’re not complicated and they’ve been used as a means of keeping wheelchairs safely in place for decades. They’re also the cheapest way to handle the situation.

 


Four-Point Tie Downs with Seat Belts

Four point tie downs with seat belts serve two important functions within many Dodge wheelchair vans. First, the serve to secure and immobilizes the wheelchair once it’s inside the vehicle. Second, they provide additional restraint for the wheelchair user. Safety conscious Dodge wheelchair van users may be interested in making them a part of their conversion processes.

 


EZ Lock

The EZ Lock system is the most effective and simple way to anchor your wheelchair inside your Dodge. Instead of tying the wheelchair down, a bracket placed on its underside is directed into a high-strength docking mechanism that will lock the chair into place until it is intentionally released. These systems are more expensive than tie downs, but their convenience and power are unrivaled.



Auto Kneel

Auto kneel systems are an integral part of many wheelchair van conversions. They allow the vehicle to set low to the ground when not in use. That decreases the slope of the wheelchair ramp, providing easier access and reducing the risk of accident. Most Grand Caravan wheelchair van conversions use an auto kneel system.



Steering Devices

Are you worried about being able to successfully steer your Dodge wheelchair van? If so, you might want to consider any of the many steering devices available as adaptations. Hand controls are one popular choice. Low-effort and zero-effort steering are also available for those who can use the standard steering wheel with assistance.



Hand Controls

Are you unable to use the standard pedals in a Dodge wheelchair van? If so, you do have a viable alternative. Hand controls can replace the “stock” pedals. You’ll be able to safely accelerate and brake using hand controls. They’re easy to use with a little training and practice and are a popular conversion.



Reduced Effort Steering

Grand Caravan wheelchair vans are created with the unique needs of their owners in mind. Some wheelchair users can’t safely or effectively use traditional steering systems. In those cases, a reduced effort steering package may be in order. The power steering system of the Grand Caravan is enhanced, allowing operation of the steering wheel with far less physical exertion.



Reduced Effort Braking

Some disabled drivers find it exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to use the standard brakes of the Grand Caravan. In many cases, this is because it requires too much force to depress the pedal. A reduced effort braking system solves the problem, making it possible to engage the antilock brakes with the application of very little pressure.

More Toyota Wheelchair Van Features


Wheelchair Ramp

Most Toyota wheelchair vans use ramps to facilitate entry and exit to and from the vehicle. Ramps are used on all side-entry wheelchair vans and on many rear-entry modifications. In most cases, users opt for a powered ramp that can be deployed and retracted with a single push of a button. These ramps stow under the vehicle, out of sight, when not in use.



Automatic Folding Ramp

Most Toyota wheelchair vans use an auto ramp. Some rear-entry variations use a lift and some people opt for manual ramps, but the great majority of conversions feature an auto ramp. These foldout wheelchair ramp deploy and retract with the push of a button and stow away under the vehicle when not in use.



Hitch Mounted Vehicle Ramp

Those who opt for a rear-entry conversion of a Toyota wheelchair van can either use a ramp or a lift for entry. Lifts can be cost-prohibitive and there are many ramp options to choose from. A hitch-mounted vehicle ramp is one option. They aren’t used as often as powered ramps that stow under the vehicle, but the fact that they are easily accessible might make them interesting to some Toyota owners.



Access Entry Space
Space is a key consideration regarding wheelchair van accessibility. That’s why Toyota supplies more than enough cabin floor space and impressive vertical space, as well.



Lowered Floor

The lowered floor gives plenty of room to move in a Dodge Caravan wheelchair van. Customer have two options, they can choose a half-drop or full-drop floor modification. The adjustment will increase overall clearance by as much as ten full inches.



Roof Height

Many wheelchair vans are modified by raising the roof and/or the doors of the vehicle. That’s unnecessary when one is working with a Toyota. It’s possible to create the necessary space without taking those actions.



Power Door

A power door can make a huge difference in the accessibility of a Toyota wheelchair van. Many wheelchair users struggle with manual doors and discover that their handles are placed in anticipation of use by standing drivers. Providing an automatic way to enter and exit the vehicle can really empower a wheelchair user. As such, power door modifications are a key part of many wheelchair van conversions.



Automatic Door

Automatic doors are a common feature in Toyota. All but the entry-level models come standard with automatic power sliding doors and remote entry. That’s a nice feature to have when converting a vehicle for use as a wheelchair van. Manual doors can be a challenge for some wheelchair users and pushbutton use is a welcome relief.



Dual Sliding Doors

The Toyota comes standard with dual sliding doors. The doors are manually operated in the base trim package, but higher trim models have fully automatic sliding doors with remote entry. Sliding doors are integral to converting the Toyota for use as a side-entry wheelchair vehicle. The provide enough room to provide easy entrance and exit to and from the vehicle.

 

Power Seat Bases

You can use a power seat base to make the transition from wheelchair to driver’s seat easier once you’re within your Toyota. These powered options allow for easy maneuvering with very little effort. They’re a popular adaptation and are not difficult to install.



Transfer Seats

Getting in and out of a Toyota wheelchair van isn’t that difficult. A good conversion will make it just as easy to move from your wheelchair to the driver’s seat once you’re within the vehicle. Transfer seats are designed to facilitate that maneuver with minimal efforts. Using them is much easier than trying to make the move from chair to driver’s seat without modification.


Removable Seating

In order to convert a stock Toyota into a functional wheelchair van, the owner will need to reconfigure the base seating plan. Side entry wheelchair van users will want to change the center row of seating. Those who use the less common rear entry plan will need to eliminate the third row. Luckily, removable seating is part of Toyota’s design.

 


Removable Passenger Seat

If a wheelchair user plans to sit in the passenger are, he or she may want to remove the stock passenger seat. That’s also true if the driver of a Toyota knows that he or she will regular transport another wheelchair user. Removing the passenger seat is a relatively simple proposition and any reputable conversion company should be able to do the job.



Removable Driver’s Seat

Some wheelchair-bound drivers will use transfer seats to get from their chairs into the driver’s seat. Others will prefer to drive from their wheelchair. That’s made possible by removing the stock driver’s seat. It’s a simple modification that any conversion manufacturer should be able to perform quickly and easily.



Electric Tie Downs

Once a wheelchair is within a Toyota wheelchair van, it’s important to properly secure it. One way to do that is by using electric tie downs. These motorized options are easier to use and require less physical strength than do traditional, manual tie downs. They’re a nice compromise between the manual tie downs and the more expensive docking systems.



Manual Tie Down

Toyota wheelchair van drivers often use manual tie downs as a means of keeping their chair in place inside the vehicle. They’re not complicated and they’ve been used as a means of keeping wheelchairs safely in place for decades. They’re also the cheapest way to handle the situation.

 


Four-Point Tie Downs with Seat Belts

Four point tie downs with seat belts serve two important functions within many Toyota wheelchair vans. First, the serve to secure and immobilizes the wheelchair once it’s inside the vehicle. Second, they provide additional restraint for the wheelchair user. Safety conscious Toyota wheelchair van users may be interested in making them a part of their conversion processes.

 


EZ Lock

The EZ Lock system is the most effective and simple way to anchor your wheelchair inside your Toyota. Instead of tying the wheelchair down, a bracket placed on its underside is directed into a high-strength docking mechanism that will lock the chair into place until it is intentionally released. These systems are more expensive than tie downs, but their convenience and power are unrivaled.



Auto Kneel

Auto kneel systems are an integral part of many wheelchair van conversions. They allow the vehicle to set low to the ground when not in use. That decreases the slope of the wheelchair ramp, providing easier access and reducing the risk of accident. Most Toyota wheelchair van conversions use an auto kneel system.



Steering Devices

Are you worried about being able to successfully steer your Toyota wheelchair van? If so, you might want to consider any of the many steering devices available as adaptations. Hand controls are one popular choice. Low-effort and zero-effort steering are also available for those who can use the standard steering wheel with assistance.



Hand Controls

Are you unable to use the standard pedals in a Toyota wheelchair van? If so, you do have a viable alternative. Hand controls can replace the “stock” pedals. You’ll be able to safely accelerate and brake using hand controls. They’re easy to use with a little training and practice and are a popular conversion.



Reduced Effort Steering

Toyota wheelchair vans are created with the unique needs of their owners in mind. Some wheelchair users can’t safely or effectively use traditional steering systems. In those cases, a reduced effort steering package may be in order. The power steering system of the Toyota is enhanced, allowing operation of the steering wheel with far less physical exertion.



Reduced Effort Braking

Some disabled drivers find it exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to use the standard brakes of the Toyota. In many cases, this is because it requires too much force to depress the pedal. A reduced effort braking system solves the problem, making it possible to engage the antilock brakes with the application of very little pressure.

The Honda Odyssey with the VMI Northstar Conversion.

The Dodge Grand Caravan with the VMI Northstar Conversion.

The Dodge Grand Caravan the VMI Summit Conversion.

The Honda Odyssey with the VMI Summit Conversion.

The Chrysler T&C with the VMI Northstar Conversion.

The Chrysler T&C with the VMI Summit Conversion.

The Toyota Sienna with the VMI Northstar Conversion.

Phone508-697-6006  ·  Fax508-697-5667 · Email info@VMiNewEngland.com

VMi New England Mobility Center Automotive Innovations, Inc. makes every effort to ensure that our information on this website is accurate and true. However, Automotive Innovations, Inc. cannot be held responsible for inaccurate information provided by outside sources. Please verify all equipment, price and options before purchase. Vehicle availability is subject to prior sale.

VMi New England Mobility Center Automotive Innovations is a one stop shop located in Bridgewater Massachusetts. We provide our customers with access to the custom fitment, service and repair of all the leading mobility wheelchair accessible vehicles. We specialize in installing hand / foot controls and devices that can offer greater freedom and independence. Our lineup includes Vantage Mobility International products, and we have a team of Certified Mobility Consultants who are always ready to help properly fit you to your new (or existing) handicapped accessible vehicle.We specialize in proper fitment of important features such as transfer seats. We carry brand names such as Chrysler/DodgeFordHondaToyota and keep a selection of new and used vehicles in stock and we accept trade in vehicles as well. All of our mobility vehicles offer tie downs and other important safety features as well as the ability to be easily upgraded with EZ Locks and other equipment.

We are a member of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association. Whenever you contact one of our Certified Mobility Consultants, you can rest assured that you are contacting a professional team member who will always offer the highest quality service in the business. We adhere to the highest standards in the industry and always provide our customers with the best service possible. Veteran’s are eligible for special benefits; we work directly with the Veterans Administration and Paralyzed Veterans of America.

We understand what your needs and desires are. Contact us today for a demonstration on what our vehicles and equipment can offer to help make your life more mobile and convenient. Our Certified Mobility Consultants will be happy to answer all of your questions and will gladly take the time to discuss the handicapped accessible vehicles and options that you feel might be the best fit to meet and fulfill your mobility needs. We will even come to you, demonstrating our vehicles at your home or place of work.

We’ve been servicing and installing mobility equipment like hand controls, zero effort steering, servo steering systems, servo gas brake, and left foot gas pedals for more than 25 years.